Black lives didn’t matter when . . .

Many people want to ignore, hide, or deny the fact that Black lives didn’t matter in much of America’s history. However, ignoring and/or justifying racism in the past or present is divisive. Here are a few historical facts.

Black lives didn’t matter when they were sold to the highest bidder and forcibly separated from their families.

Black lives didn’t matter when the Founding Fathers refused to apply the principles of America’s founding documents to Black people.

Black lives didn’t matter when slaves were whipped or tortured in America for not fully cooperating with the people who were stealing their labor and trafficking them.

Black lives didn’t matter when they were frequently insulted, mocked, and looked down on by White people & in American media.

Black lives didn’t matter when more than 4,000 Black people were lynched by White mobs as courts and law enforcement rarely held anyone accountable.

Black lives didn’t matter when Black people were made to live under the continual threat of violence if they didn’t “stay in their place.”

Black lives didn’t matter when the United States Supreme Court legalized Jim Crow laws that treated Black people as if they didn’t matter.

Black lives didn’t matter when Black people weren’t allowed to testify in court.

Black lives didn’t matter when they were treated differently and denied equal rights because of their skin color.

Black lives didn’t matter when Black people weren’t allowed equal access to jobs and equal pay for equal work.

Black lives don’t matter if the police are more willing to kill an unarmed Black person than an unarmed White person.

Black lives don’t matter when their long history of pain and heartbreak is denied and unheard.

Black lives didn’t matter when they were subjected to race massacres in Tulsa (1921), Chicago (1919), Detroit (1943), New York (1863), Washington (1919), Springfield, MO (1908), East Saint Louis (1917), Memphis (1866), Wilmington, VA (1898), Elaine, AR (1919), Atlanta (1906), Vicksburg, MS (1874), Clinton, MS (1875), Eufaula, MS (1874), Camila, GA (1868), Slocum, TX (1910), Colfax, LA (1873), Opelousas, LA (1868), Thibadox, LA (1867), New Orleans (1876), St. Bernard Parish, LA (1868), Rosewood, FL (1923), Ocoee, FL (1920) and various other places.

Want to learn more?

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

About Steve Simms

I like to look and think outside the box. In college I encountered Jesus Christ and I have been passionate about trying to get to know Him better ever since. My wife and I co-lead a non-traditional expression of the body of Christ in Nashville based on open participation and Spirit-led sharing. We long to see the power and passion of the first Christ-followers come to life in our time. I have written a book about our experiences called, "Beyond Church: An Invitation To Experience The Lost Word Of The Bible--Ekklesia" that is available in Kindle & paperback @ http://amzn.to/2nCr5dP
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