Impoliteness — what’s it good for? Nonviolence matters.

Impoliteness — what’s it good for? Nonviolence matters. If you won’t “love your enemies,” you’ll probably provoke them into greater and greater hostility. However, if you feel justified in the use or threat of violence, you may silence your conscience when it tells you kindness is better.

Humans have been so influenced by violence that the idea of embracing nonviolence seems crazy (but it’s powerful). Kindness and joy have the power to deescalate violent situations

Nonviolence is a mighty weapon. It’s not a weakness, but a bold and courageous declaration of moral, emotional and spiritual strength.

Injustice is an ongoing state of conflict — of wrong overriding what’s right. It falls far short of genuine peace. To recognize injustice and refuse to cooperate with it, is a bold step toward justice. Nonviolent noncooperation is a great weapon against evil.

To confront violence with violence takes courage, but to confront violence with nonviolence requires even more courage. However, Christians who truly and completely trust their bodyguard, the living Jesus, wouldn’t feel the need to protect themselves.

Every country needs more monuments that celebrate nonviolence and more that honor peaceful heroes of equality. It’s easy to see injustice when it happens to you or to someone you love; difficult when it happens in neighborhoods you avoid.

Slavery was a state of perpetual cruelty maintained by the ongoing threat of violence that could be unleashed at any moment. The American Abolitionist movement boldly confronted it with nonviolent action. The dead can’t ask for justice, but those of us who are alive can at least acknowledge the injustice they suffered. All lives matter, including those lives that were enslaved and/or abused in history by racial injustice. Search for: Off the RACE Track book.

Jesus on nonviolence:

  • Take a punch without retaliation. (“Turn the other cheek.”)
  • Jesus on nonviolence: If somebody takes something from you, give them something extra.
  • If someone imposes on you, do more than they expect (“the second mile”).
  • Keep on forgiving a person over and over (70 X 7 times).
  • Be kind to those who plot against you (“love your enemies”).
  • Say good things about people who say bad things about you (“bless those who curse you”).
  • Ask God to bless people who attack you (“pray for those who spitefully use you”).

Instead of insulting or attacking someone’s opinion, why not lovingly offer them a better alternative? It creates delight to be polite, but being rude causes people to feud. Manners make a difference, especially in a society that has publicly accepted rude and crude behavior and words.

Opinions shared with kindness and humility are much more likely to be received than those presented with pride and anger.

Revival happens when Christians turn away from following religious programs and begin to listen to and obey the living Jesus.

About Steve Simms

I like to look and think outside the box. In college I encountered Jesus Christ and I have been passionate about trying to get to know Him better ever since. My wife and I co-lead a non-traditional expression of the body of Christ in Nashville based on open participation and Spirit-led sharing. We long to see the power and passion of the first Christ-followers come to life in our time. I have written a book about our experiences called, "Beyond Church: An Invitation To Experience The Lost Word Of The Bible--Ekklesia" that is available in Kindle & paperback @ http://amzn.to/2nCr5dP
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